EDDIE JONES has been rapped over the knuckles for blasting England’s posh boys.

Last weekend Jones claimed privately-educated players struggled to become on-pitch leaders and the fee-paying school set-up should be banned.

Red Rose chief Eddie Jones has been pulled up by RFU chiefs after suggesting players from fee-paying schools can be too soft in some waysGetty

GettyRFU chief exec Bill Sweeney insists the union supports the role of both independent and state schools[/caption]

The Aussie reckons the system churns out players who cannot make decisions on the field and crack under pressure because of their ‘closeted’ upbringing.

And RFU chief executive Bill Sweeney has pulled Jones up on his comments and distanced the union from the head coach’s stance.

An RFU statement read: “Bill Sweeney spoke to the England head coach, Eddie Jones, on Sunday and confirmed the RFU position on the valued role the independent sector plays in the player pathway.

“The most recent England men’s squad contained players who have benefited from time within independent schools, including Maro Itoje and Henry Arundell, as well as many from the state sector including, Jonny Hill and Courtney Lawes.

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“The RFU is hugely appreciative and supportive of the role both the independent and state school sectors play in introducing boys and girls to our sport and in our player pathway. 

“A collaborative approach and strong partnerships within the education sector ensure players are supported and offered opportunities to develop at all schools.”

Jones’ 23 which beat the Wallabies 21-17 in Sydney last month contained 13 privately educated players such as Freddie Steward, Jamie George and Marcus Smith.

Skipper Lawes, Owen Farrell, Ellis Genge and Jack Nowell were amongst the 10 who went to state school.


Sir Clive Woodward, one of Jones’ predecessors at Twickenham, accused the Australian of belittling the English game.

Jones had said: “When things go to crap on the field who’s going to lead because these blokes have never had experience of it?”

“When we are on the front foot we are the best in the world.When we are not on the front foot our ability to find a way to win, our resolve, is not as it should be.”

Sweeney had words with Jones in 2021 when the coach said ‘poison was being written about his team but backed his man after a dismal Six Nations.

Sweeney was also forced to apologise for Jones’ remarks about Wales and Ireland at a conference in 2018.

Jones led England to a 2-1 over Australia this summer which guaranteed he would keep the job until the end of his contract after the next World Cup.

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